“A Smell Of Honey! A Swallow Of Brine!” Vintage Sexploitation From New York’s 42nd Street Grindhouse Era!

 

the-deuce-42nd-street-movies-of-the-70s

<strong>
This Wasn’t Your Mother’s Times Square!</strong>
Folks, these pictures are from Times Square in the 70’s and early 80’s – a seedy strip filled with movie houses that showed exploitation films 24 hours a day – that’s how the term “grindhouse” came to be: theaters that were grinding out cheap “dirty movies” all day and night…

times-square-42nd-street-grindhouse

times-square-70s

New York’s 42nd street district was a real “anything goes” area in the 70’s and 80’s, until they cleaned it up…the HBO series “The Deuce” captures this seedy world…look at the names of some of this films on the marquee – and here is one of my favorite titles of all:

asmellofhoneyaswallowofbrine_1966_

<strong>
“A Smell Of Honey A Swallow Of Brine”</strong>
One of the most exploitive titles you can imagine, this image showcases exactly what these films promised: dirty girls doing naughty things…and check out the phrases on the poster!

smell_of_honey_swallow_of_brine_poster_01

An Adult Experience!

Yes, this poster used phrases like “cunning young cannibal” and “soft warm trap” to lure the men in. It didn’t matter that early films like this showed very little nudity – it was all part of the “come on” to lure young men into the theaters – these early films made wild claims in the posters that were never in the film itself!

Click here for a list of some of the wildest titles!

 

<strong>https://johnrieber.com/2012/06/06/psycho-go-go-dancers-delinquent-schoolgirls-and-candy-snatchers-more-70s-grindhouse/</strong&gt;

Let me know if you’ve seen any of these grindhouse classics!

 

fleshpot on 42nd street



Categories: 70's Films, Camp Cult Classics, Cult Classics, Euro-Sleaze, Exploitation Films, Grindhouse, JRsploitation, Nudity, Sexploitation Films, Uncategorized

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2 replies

  1. I recall this from your other blog. Great feature, John!
    A real history lesson in what used to be ‘alternative cinema’.
    Best wishes, Pete.

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